What makes us unique?

We generate commitment in participants to develop and practice effective behaviours through skilful conversations that help them to identify their beliefs that can get in the way of inspiring others and delivering superior results.

We design the follow up systems and processes that are required to support sustainable and demonstrably visible behaviour change back in the workplace.
 
Stillwater Mastery Model
Our experience is that it is only when all the following 9 steps are completed that behaviour change becomes sustainable. Any program that does not cover all 9 steps will only be partially effective.
 
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Intellectual understanding: Leadership theory is usually covered by most programs, but this is only the first step.

Self awareness: Participants take an honest look in the mirror at their actual behaviours.

Emotional arousal: Participants see where their habits are at odds with their values. Cognitive dissonance provides a strong motivation to change.

Choice: Participants compare the benefits and prices of acquiring new leadership behaviours with those of continuing with existing habits.

Declaration: Participants publicly commit to the developmental goals they will be working on.

Completion: New behaviours have been internalized. Greater challenges are taken on and the developmental cycle begins again at the next level.

Maintenance: New habits have been created but managers can slip back under pressure. Our quarterly newsletters remind them to keep practicing.

Practice: Participants implement their learning back at work, often with the support of an executive coach to internalize and deepen new habits.

Planning: Participants consider the actions, practices and support systems they will need to internalize new behaviours.

Intellectual understanding: Leadership theory is usually covered by most programs, but this is only the first step.

Self awareness: Participants take an honest look in the mirror at their actual behaviours.

Emotional arousal: Participants see where their habits are at odds with their values. Cognitive dissonance provides a strong motivation to change.

Choice: Participants compare the benefits and prices of acquiring new leadership behaviours with those of continuing with existing habits.

Declaration: Participants publicly commit to the developmental goals they will be working on.

Completion: New behaviours have been internalized. Greater challenges are taken on and the developmental cycle begins again at the next level.

Maintenance: New habits have been created but managers can slip back under pressure. Our quarterly newsletters remind them to keep practicing.

Practice: Participants implement their learning back at work, often with the support of an executive coach to internalize and deepen new habits.

Planning: Participants consider the actions, practices and support systems they will need to internalize new behaviours.